Ram ‘s horn, Devil ‘s claw, Proboscidea louisianica …#4

Ram ‘s horn, Devil ‘s claw, Proboscidea louisianica …#4
4th of july crafts
Image by Vietnam Plants & The USA. plants
Taken on July 28, 2012 in Waco city, Texas state, Southern of America.

Vietnamese named : Ngà voi, Vuốt quỷ.
Common names : Devil’s Claw, Unicorn Plant, Ram’s Horn , Proboscis flower.
Scientist name : Proboscidea louisianica (Mill.) Thell.
Synonyms :
Family : Pedaliaceae – Sesame family
Group : Dicot
Duration : Annual
Growth Habit : Forb/herb
Kingdom : Plantae – Plants
Subkingdom: Tracheobionta – Vascular plants
Superdivision: Spermatophyta – Seed plants
Division : Magnoliophyta – Flowering plants
Class: Magnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
Subclass : Asteridae
Order : Scrophulariales
Genus :Proboscidea Schmidel – unicorn-plant
Species :Proboscidea louisianica (Mill.) Thell. – ram’s horn

**** plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=PRLO
**** www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Proboscidea+louisi…
**** columbus-cactus-club.webs.com/Proboscidea louisianica.htm

**** waynesword.palomar.edu/ww0801.htm#Indians : Click on link to read more, please.
Devil’s Claws Used By Native Americans Of The S.W. United States

Perhaps the most fascinating thing about devil’s claw plants are the curious seed pods. When they hang in clusters on the branches the green, fleshy fruits resemble bean pods or okra. They are cultivated in gardens of Native Americans throughout the southwest and are cooked and eaten as a vegetable. The nutritious dried seeds are rich in oil and protein and can be shelled and eaten. Sometimes the oily seeds are used to polish ollas. I found the cooked fruits quite bitter, but perhaps I didn’t prepare them in the right way or use enough seasoning. In some parts of the United States they are grown and pickled like cucumbers and okra, either alone or with other vegetables. …..

**** waynesword.palomar.edu/ww0801.htm : Click on link to read more, please.
The devil’s claw fruit is technically a drupaceous capsule with a woody inner part surrounded by a fleshy layer. The rather sinister common name of "devil’s claw" refers to the inner woody capsule which splits open at one end into two curved horns or claws. Each capsule contains about 40 black seeds which are gradually released when the claws split apart. They are also called "elephant tusks" and readily cling to the hooves of grazing animals or your shoes if you happen to step on them. In some areas of the southwestern United States they are a nuisance to sheep ranchers because they get entangled in the fleece. In his fascinating book, Plants and Planet (1974), Anthony Huxley (son of Julian Huxley) eloquently describes the hitchhiking pods as "hookers." The fresh green pods (and dried black seed capsules) were important items in the cultures of many Native American tribes of the southwestern United States, and are still used to this day for food and in basketry. The plant is also known as "unicorn plant," referring to the large, hornlike fruit before is has split open.

**** www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=PRLO
Ram’s-horn or devil’s claw is a low, spreading, bushy plant, 1-2 ft. tall, with large, long-stemmed, palmately lobed leaves. Leaves, 5-inches across and up to 1 foot long, covered with glandular nectar which often collects sand particles. Its creamy-yellow, tubular, five-lobed flowers are spotted with purple and appear in few-flowered, axillary clusters after summer rains. The fruit is a fleshy, curved pod that splits into two claws when it dries.

The name unicorn plant refers to the remarkable fruits. These are at first fleshy, the flesh later falling away, leaving an inner woody shell tipped by a long, curved beak (the horn of the unicorn). The beak splits lengthwise, and the shell opens between the two parts of the split beak. These fruits are easily caught on the legs of deer, rabbits, and cattle or hooked in the wool of sheep by their spreading claws (thus the name devils claw). The fruits are collected and used in nature crafts.

Bloom Color: White , Pink , Yellow , Purple

BENEFIT
Use Ornamental: The fruits are collected and used in nature crafts.
Use Food: This plant is often cultivated for the fruit, which is pickled and eaten like okra.